Concussions and culture – how you can reduce the amount of traumatic brain injuries in youth ice hockey


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Concussions and culture – how you can reduce the amount of traumatic brain injuries in youth ice hockey

Toronto, April 21, 2016

By Marc Dodsworth

Dr. Michael Cusimano
Dr. Michael Cusimano

A cultural shift is required to reduce the amount of traumatic brain injuries in youth ice hockey, stated Dr. Michael Cusimano, a neurosurgeon and investigator at St. Michael’s Hospital.

“The culture of powerful connection with other players that people imbue within our professional sports may be the primary reason we have seen this type of large number of concussions in youth hockey,” Dr. Cusimano stated Tuesday in the 2016 Visiting Professor in Injuries Prevention Symposium held at Sick Kids Hospital.

Research by Dr. Cusimano discovered that hockey makes up about up to 50 % of traumatic brain injuries that needed emergency care among children and youth taking part in organized sports. The research discovered that connection with other players was the predominant mechanism through which players sustained traumatic brain injuries.

In the speech Dr. Cusimano referenced research printed within the Journal from the Ama that discovered that the chance of game-related injuries, including concussion, elevated by three occasions among 11- to 12-year-old hockey players in leagues that allowed bodychecking when compared with leagues that didn’t.

“When we allow bodychecking in hockey, there is a behavioural alternation in players that includes to some culture of aggression in sport,” Dr. Cusimano stated in the symposium organized through the College of Toronto Trauma Program and also the Dr. Tom Pashby Sports Safety Fund. “We can enforce protective measures like putting on protective gear for example pads and helmets but we have to also take a look at rule changes as well as their enforcement to actually change culture in ways people can understand.”

Several attempts happen to be made in the high end to curtail our prime quantity of traumatic brain injuries in ice hockey. The Ontario Hockey League enacted a guide against bodychecking in the year 2006 and also the 2011-12 Nhl season saw the implementation of Rule 48, which enforced a 2-minute minor penalty for targeted hits towards the mind from the direction.

However, this didn’t create a decrease in concussion rates, as present in research brought by Dr. Cusimano.

“Either the guidelines have to be enforced more strictly and also the effects, more serious, or players are getting difficulty adjusting to the brand new rules,” stated Dr. Cusimano, a researcher in St. Michael’s Li Ka Shing Understanding Institute. “This is really a cultural issue. If things don’t change in the high end, more youthful players, who so frequently imitate the professionals, will still be at high-risk for traumatic brain injuries.”

Dr. Cusimano stated that rule changes, when coupled with educational programs, might be a promising technique to reduce the amount of concussions.

The Canadian Pediatric Society recommends that bodychecking be banned from competitive hockey leagues before the bantam level (13 to 14 years of age).

“We have to determine that we actually need bodychecking hanging around and get ourselves what purpose it serves,” stated Dr. Cusimano.

“And fighting clearly doesn’t have devote the game.Inches

This paper is a good example of how St. Michael’s Hospital is making Ontario Healthier, Wealthier, Smarter.

About St. Michael’s Hospital

St. Michael’s Hospital provides compassionate choose to all who enter its doorways. A healthcare facility offers outstanding medical education to future medical professionals in 27 academic disciplines. Critical care and trauma, cardiovascular disease, neurosurgery, diabetes, cancer care, proper care of the destitute and global health are some of the hospital’s recognized special areas of practice. With the Keenan Research Center and also the Li Ka Shing Worldwide Healthcare Education Center, which from the Li Ka Shing Understanding Institute, research and education at St. Michael’s Hospital are recognized making an effect all over the world. Founded in 1892, a healthcare facility is fully associated with the College of Toronto.

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