Review finds high attrition rate among residents generally surgery programs


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Review finds high attrition rate among residents generally surgery programs

Toronto, December 14, 2016

By Leslie Shepherd

Dr. Mohammed Al-Omran
Dr. Mohammed Al-Omran

Almost 1 in 5 residents generally surgery programs leave before finishing and the most typical reasons given are unmanageable lifestyle and choosing to switch specialties, research printed today finds.

Despite the development of rules on resident duty hour limitations within the U . s . States in 2003, resident attrition remains a substantial issue, specifically in general surgery training programs. General surgery programs are some of the best in medicine and frequently attract high-calibre applicants.

Dr. Mohammed Al-Omran, a vascular surgeon at St. Michael’s Hospital in Toronto, printed online today in JAMA Surgery a literature review in excess of 20 studies, many of them American, that incorporated 19,821 residents generally surgery programs.

The pooled estimate for that overall attrition prevalence among general surgery residents was 18 percent. Departing residents frequently relocated to a different general surgery program (20 %), frequently because of family or geographic reasons, or switched to anesthesia (13 %) along with other “lifestyle friendly” specialties, mainly cosmetic surgery, radiology and family medicine.

The most typical reported reasons for attrition were unmanageable lifestyle (the studies ranged from 12 percent to 88 percent) and transferring to a different niche (19 percent to 39 percent). Other reported causes incorporated poor performance, dismissal, family or spousal factors, health problems and financial burden.

Attrition was considerably greater among women than men (25 percent versus. 15 percent) and many residents left following the newbie from the program (48 percent).

The attrition rate among general surgery residents appeared to become similar to those of obstetrics and gynecology and neurosurgery, stated Dr. Al-Omran, who is another researcher within the Keenan Research Center for Biomedical Science of St. Michael’s Hospital.

However the rates are greater among general surgery residents than to many other specialties, including ophthalmology, otolaryngology and orthopedics, he stated, postulating this can be because of the variable demands of various surgical training programs. General surgery programs have greater clinical demands than another programs, he stated, which might have significant effects on resident lifestyle. Dr. Al-Omran stated several factors may take into account the greater attrition rate among women, including insufficient appropriate heroines, the thought of gender discrimination, negative attitudes toward women in surgery as well as sexual harassment.

This paper is a good example of how St. Michael’s Hospital is making Ontario Healthier, Wealthier, Smarter.

About St. Michael’s Hospital

St. Michael’s Hospital provides compassionate choose to all who enter its doorways. A healthcare facility offers outstanding medical education to future medical professionals in 27 academic disciplines. Critical care and trauma, cardiovascular disease, neurosurgery, diabetes, cancer care, proper care of the destitute and global health are some of the hospital’s recognized special areas of practice. With the Keenan Research Center and also the Li Ka Shing Worldwide Healthcare Education Center, which from the Li Ka Shing Understanding Institute, research and education at St. Michael’s Hospital are recognized making an effect all over the world. Founded in 1892, a healthcare facility is fully associated with the College of Toronto.

Media contacts

To learn more in order to arrange a job interview with Dr. Al-Omran, please contact:

Leslie Shepherd
Manager, Media Strategy, St. Michael’s Hospital
416-864-6094
[email protected]

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